Feng Shui Bedroom

She tells me “This room is unbalanced.
Avoid placing your bed under ceiling features.
No water pictures. Get rid of clutter.
No plants, flowers, books, or electronics here.”

I lie on the bed, feeling unbalanced.

Image: Darkmoon_Art

The Chinese words “feng” and “shui” translate to mean “wind” and “water,” respectively. This concept is derived from an ancient poem that talks about human life being connected and flowing with the environment around it. In the philosophy of feng shui, arranging the pieces in living spaces can create balance with the natural world, harness energy forces and establish harmony between you and the environment.

In my mind, it is connected to the Tao, which translates to mean “the way.” Taoism is the way of nature.

For those who truly follow feng shui principles, they can be used to design towns, homes, rooms, and even the desk and area where you work. The placement of ancient Chinese grave sites used this philosophy in order to bring positive chi to a grave.

For an American practitioner, it will probably mean getting rid of things.

In a Liminal Space

Not a physical space between one destination
and the next – a hallway, airport, street –
but on the precipice of something new
but not quite there yet, and so –

hesitant – gazing through a veil of uncertainty.

Photo by Pedro Figueras on Pexels.com

Overview of liminality

Might I but moor – Tonight – With Thee

Fast and flimsy sex and still not
able to sleep, but she has fallen –

under the covers to the other world.

I move down the cold, dark passage
where every move I make echoes twice.

legs

I was reading about Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who prepared the first edition of Emily Dickinson’s poems in 1890. He wrote to his co-editor: “One poem only I dread a little to print – that wonder ‘Wild Nights,’ – lest the malignant read into it more than that virgin recluse ever dreamed of putting there. . . . Yet what a loss to omit it! Indeed it is not to be omitted.”

That comment made me look at the poem again and think about Emily – that virgin recluse – fantasizing in her room one night when she couldn’t sleep.

Emily’s poem:

Wild Nights – Wild Nights!
Were I with thee
Wild Nights should be
Our luxury!

Futile – the Winds –
To a Heart in port –
Done with the Compass –
Done with the Chart!

Rowing in Eden –
Ah, the Sea!
Might I but moor –
Tonight – With Thee!

Emily Dickinson

Death Cleaning

It’s not dusting, vacuuming or straightening up.
It’s permanent organization for your everyday life.
It’s the cleaning your family would do
after your death, being done by you.
Clear conscience and shelves in the afterlife.

 

Photo by Min An on Pexels.com

The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning: How to Free Yourself and Your Family from a Lifetime of Clutter 
In Sweden, this is called döstädning, dö meaning “death” and städning meaning “cleaning.” Clearing out unnecessary belongings can be undertaken at any age or life stage but should be done sooner than later – before others have to do it for you. This method for putting things in order helps families broach sensitive conversations, and makes the process uplifting rather than overwhelming.