A Graveyard of Stars

graveyard

Image by scartmyart from Pixabay

Remains of many dead and dying stars
in a vast graveyard near the center
of our Milky Way galaxy in a
black hole where the dead feed on
others – like celestial zombies emitting X-ray howls.

 

graveyard of stars

Milky Way center —by NASA, ESA, SSC, SXC & STSCI

Read about the science

Beyond What Is Seen

The mathematics told him that the star

was beyond the Milky Way, whole galaxies

beyond ours, but a young girl tending sheep

long before him looked into the night sky

and knew there was something unseen beyond.

Young Shepherdess Standing

William-Adolphe Bouguereau – Young Shepherdess Standing (1887)

Astronomer Edwin Hubble announced the discovery of other galaxies beyond the Milky Way in 1924. Before he made his discovery, everyone thought that our Milky Way galaxy was the only galaxy in the universe, and that there wasn’t much outside it besides the Magellanic Clouds, which were thought to be clouds of gas or dust. We know now that the Magellanic Clouds are really dwarf galaxies. He renamed the Andromeda Nebula the “Andromeda galaxy,” and he went on to discover 23 more separate galaxies. Within a few years of Hubble’s discovery, most astronomers came to agree that our galaxy is just one of millions.

Magellanic Clouds

The Milky Way and the major and minor Magellanic Clouds as seen by NASA‘s SOFIA in the southern sky from New Zealand.

 

Known to ancient navigators of the seas

as markers in their endless night sky,

looking like starry clouds, distant heavenly mountains,

named by one on Magellan’s Earthly circumnavigation –

two galaxies circling our own for eternity.